Jan Phillips' award-winning book, Wild Edibles of Missouri, was published in 1979 and is now out of print. We've preserved it here as a PDF. Download it to learn how to turn wild Missouri plants into biscuits, fritters, jellies, juices, pancakes, pies, salads, soups, wines and more. Color illustrations help you identify plants that are poisonous or have poisonous parts. -Check it out!

Always be cautious when eating edible mushrooms. Make a certain ID and only eat a small amount the first time you try it to avoid a reaction.


    Photo of corn salad plant flower clusters showing arrangement of buds.

    Corn Salad

    Valerianella radiata
    fork and knife icon

    Edible

    Image of Johnny-jump-up.

    Johnny-Jump-Up (Field Pansy)

    Viola bicolor
    fork and knife icon

    Edible

    Photo of spring beauty plants and flowers

    Spring Beauty

    Claytonia virginica
    fork and knife icon

    Edible

    Photo of tall thistle plants with flowers

    Tall Thistle

    Cirsium altissimum
    fork and knife icon

    Edible

    Photo of wild hyacinth flower cluster

    Wild Hyacinth

    Camassia scilloides
    fork and knife icon

    Edible

    Photo of pink wild onion flower clusters

    Wild Onion

    Allium stellatum
    fork and knife icon

    Edible