Jan Phillips' award-winning book, Wild Edibles of Missouri, was published in 1979 and is now out of print. We've preserved it here as a PDF. Download it to learn how to turn wild Missouri plants into biscuits, fritters, jellies, juices, pancakes, pies, salads, soups, wines and more. Color illustrations help you identify plants that are poisonous or have poisonous parts. -Check it out!

Always be cautious when eating edible mushrooms. Make a certain ID and only eat a small amount the first time you try it to avoid a reaction.


    Illustration of black gum flowers and fruits.

    Black Gum

    Nyssa sylvatica
    fork and knife icon

    Edible

    Illustration of chinkapin oak leaf.

    Chinkapin Oak (Chinquapin Oak)

    Quercus muehlenbergii
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    Edible

    Illustration of hackberry leaves, stem, fruit.

    Common Hackberry

    Celtis occidentalis
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    Edible

    Illustration of overcup oak leaf.

    Overcup Oak

    Quercus lyrata
    fork and knife icon

    Edible

    Illustration of pawpaw leaves, flowers, fruits.

    Pawpaw

    Asimina triloba
    fork and knife icon

    Edible

    Illustration of pecan leaf and fruit.

    Pecan

    Carya illinoinensis
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    Edible

    Illustration of red mulberry leaves and fruits.

    Red Mulberry

    Morus rubra
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    Edible

    Illustration of shellbark hickory leaf and fruits.

    Shellbark Hickory

    Carya laciniosa
    fork and knife icon

    Edible

    Illustration of swamp chestnut oak leaf.

    Swamp Chestnut Oak (Basket Oak)

    Quercus michauxii
    fork and knife icon

    Edible